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Cornwall

We are What We Eat

Earlier this month, an Australian study provided the first solid evidence that diet can have a role in treating major depression. It is somewhat surprising that this research hasn’t been done before. We have long suspected that the nature and quality of our food can influence people’s risk of depression. It has always been a fairly confident best guess that ‘we are what we eat’ and that some foods change our moods for the worse whilst others offer more protection.

Being Nice at Work

Recent psychological research shows that increasing positive behaviour between people at work has two important benefits; people get less stressed and they work better. Positive behaviour is where people are respectful of you as a person and you feel appreciated. Negative behaviour is where people are rude, disrespectful and are too busy to give you the time of day.

Getting Things Done

Many of us have a list of things we would like to get done but somehow never get round to doing. The art of getting things done and achieving everything on our to-do list is probably one of the key tools for a successful life. But, as we all know, getting our sleeves rolled up and doing what needs to be done is something we can avoid all day long. It is the ‘doing’ bit of the equation that puts us off. As Thomas Edison said, “Opportunity is missed because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work”.

Therapy from Home

Getting therapy and counselling for anxiety or depression doesn’t always involve having to visit an office or location somewhere to talk to a complete stranger face-to-face. An exciting area of development is that psychological therapy can now be provided online. It is possible to receive therapy for a range of problems, such as stress, anxiety and depression, in the comfort of your own home. The online solutions are delivered through a range of devices, including desktop computers, tablets and mobile phones.

Time Flies

Has 2016 flown by for you? Is that because you were having fun, or is it because you are getting older? Interestingly, psychological research suggests that we all experience the passing of time differently, and that doing lots of new things may be the key to subjectively slowing time down.

Brighter Outlook, Better Health

New research suggests that people having a positive perspective on their future have a lower risk of death and major illness compared to people who have a more pessimistic outlook. A major study, published last week, followed the health of 70,000 older women over a six year period. Their average age was about seventy years old. The womens' level of optimism was measured by a questionnaire that asked how much they agreed with statements such as, “I’m always optimistic about my future”.

Productivity Advice from a Hundred Years Ago

These days there are so many books on time management and improving productivity you could spend a lifetime exploring them. And this would not be a good use of time! So, I prefer the simplicity of a one-hundred year old method that was developed in 1918 by a productivity guru of the time called Ivy Lee. It earned him nearly half a million dollars in today’s money, when he increased productivity in steel executives by twenty percent. There are five basic steps.

The Art of Acceptance

Many of life’s difficulties stem from an inability to accept things as they are. Sometimes this is because we experience a big gap between how we want things to be and how they actually are. Modern society doesn’t help with this – it creates expectations about what we should own or possess, or how we should look, or how we should be living our lives. Despite the fact that most of us live a life that would be on a par with royalty some centuries ago, we still remain dissatisfied. This dissatisfaction is further fuelled by a sense of entitlement – a belief that we deserve better.

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