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Life-Skills

Productivity Advice from a Hundred Years Ago

These days there are so many books on time management and improving productivity you could spend a lifetime exploring them. And this would not be a good use of time! So, I prefer the simplicity of a one-hundred year old method that was developed in 1918 by a productivity guru of the time called Ivy Lee. It earned him nearly half a million dollars in today’s money, when he increased productivity in steel executives by twenty percent. There are five basic steps.

Doing What Needs to Be Done

Are you procrastinating your life away? Are you forever putting things off until tomorrow? If you are, then you won’t be surprised to hear that you are probably underachieving in your life. However, the research also tells us that if you chronically procrastinate you are more likely to experience stress and other health problems. How does that work?

The Reason Giving Machine

I was ten minutes late for a dental appointment last week. It had been a fraught journey. I explained to the dentist that I had been stuck at a level crossing, held up behind a learner driver and then couldn’t find a parking space. This was all actually true, although, if I’m honest, I was also slightly over-egging it. To give reasons for our actions is very normal. And, our brain can fire out these reasons all day long. We give reasons in order to be reasonable. If I had been asked why I was late, and replied, “No reason”, then I would have been unreasonable.

Working with Focus

The ability to focus our mind is something we take for granted. But one of the many challenges of living in the twenty first century is being able to keep our focus in the midst of a relentless flow of information and distractions. These constant interruptions and lack of focus can make us feel edgy, restless and increases our stress levels.

First Impressions

What do we look for when we meet someone for the first time? Apparently, research tells us that we make fairly instant judgements about new people. For example, research around job interviews suggests that decisions are often formed in the first few minutes, sometimes even before we have had the chance to sit down.

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